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Jim considering a delicate point.
Jim Richardson's
“Fundamentals of Stand-Up Comedy Workshops,”
Course descriptions for Lessons 1-4

Introduction to Lessons 1-4
Lesson 1: How to Tell a Joke | Lesson 2: How to Write a Joke | Lesson 3: Character | Lesson 4: Editing

Introduction:
Covers the major bases in today's rapidly expanding comedy business,
and strategies for breaking through personal barriers.
My workshops are highly interactive:
You will be required to get up on stage many times during the Lessons.
Your efforts will be video recorded.
Why?
If you accidentally create a great joke,
we will have it on tape.

Not to worry:
No one will have access to our recordings of you after the Workshop.
However, for a small fee, you can arrange for us to make a copy of only your work.

Or you may record yourself, but you may not record other attendees.
Why?
Because the goal of all my Workshops is to create a safe place to take risks, where you can freely try new writing and performance techniques.

Hopefully, this process will get you used to recording all your future performances.
This habit is crucial for monitoring your progress.

There will be absolutely no pressure to be funny today.

If you are funny, all well and good.
But my main goal it to teach you as many writing and performance techniques as possible in the time allowed.
So, bring at least your brain with you today.
Funny bone is optional.


Hopefully, this process will get you used to recording all your future performances.
This habit is crucial for monitoring your progress.
No wallflowers at this dance!
You will learn by doing.
And often.

Note: I will be offering definitions of common terms in stand-up comedy which will expand your current understanding.
So, if some things in this outline seem odd to more experienced performers,
it will make sense soon enough during the Workshop
.

These are the first 1-4 of 35 proven lessons that I have used for decades
to train both beginning and even much more experienced folks
into becoming more successful comics and keynote speakers:


Lesson 1-4 registration.

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Lesson One: “How to Tell a Joke: on stage, during a speech and in the work place” Lesson 1-4 registration.

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Lesson Two: “How to Write a Joke: the 7 basic joke forms”

Story of how one very frustrated writer escaped Writer's Block! (00:54)
iPhone/iPod/iPad version | Computer version

Sometimes trying to find simple answers to complex questions . . ..
You just end up being silly!
Seven specific one-liner joke forms: Escaping "Writer's Block": Making a reasonable writing contract with yourself: Lesson 1-4 registration.

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Lesson Three: "Character: your main character, minor characters”

Make your jokes more dramatic: Character analysis: The purpose of art:
"Poetics" by Aristotle.
I) Action
II) Character
III) Thought: Spoken argument vs. Implied argument

"Character Analysis Work Sheet:"
Begin a characterization by working on your new character's walk
What animal does each comic's walk resembles?
Who has more character in his/her walk?

Puppet and ventriloquist game:
basic character contrasting made easy with one little trick.

Punching up old jokes = Savers!

Character history: Choices
1) moral: something is either right or wrong
2) likes and dislikes

Obstacles -- Winding the internal spring tight
"Laughter," by Henri Bergson,
the eternal Jack-in-the-box


Lesson 1-4 registration.

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Lesson Four: “Editing: Your Comedy or Serious Speech into an Act”
"This is where the money is."

Show me your shoebox!! (1:22)
iPhone/iPod/iPad version | Computer version

Discover the real math that makes the difference between the Little League standards of your local comedy scene and the Major League standards of national broadcast television.
Compare/contrast all the comics we have studied in Workshop Lessons 1-4.
What separates the character of the comic having a successful first time national TV appearance from those not so successful?
What makes these budding comedy stars so very different from the “saloon” players whose acts do not translate into the “big leagues” of national television?
In other words, by this point in our study of “The Fundamentals of Stand-Up Comedy,” what is your current personal profile of the “ideal” stand-up comic?
iPhone/iPod/iPad version | Computer version

Editing symbols The real standards for "Big League" comedy —
Comics who had successful first
appearances on
NBC-TV's "Tonight Show with Johnny Carson"
Which launched their enduring national careers.
Now, update your profile of the "ideal" stand-up comic!!!

How to get more laughter without more jokes!
  • What are "takes?"
  • Examples of extended takes.
  • How another performer can help you get more laughs
  • Telegraphing —How great comics "play the laugh."

  • Character in stand-up comedy vs. rock and roll music:
  • Jann Wenner of "Rolling Stone":
  • Moral statements = "The way that they wanted to live life"
End of Fundamentals of Stand-Up Comedy Workshop!!!

4 Lessons down, 31 Lessons to go!


Lesson 1-4 registration.

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Page last updated: Tuesday, August 6, 2013, 2:09 pm PST.
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Home | Video | Coaching & Co-Writing | Order | About | Techniques | Register | FAQ | Contact
Studying Comics | Comedy Roots | Comeback? | Defense | Character mask | Robin | Censorship
Writer's block | Camcorder Coaching | Memorizing | Remembering | Setting a bit
Business | Business Cards | Your Web Site | Open Mics | Evil "Bringer Shows" | Audition | MC tips
Promo Packet | Contact media | Interviews | How to get BIG-$ Gig$ | Agents vs. Managers
Newsletter | Goodies | Auditioning: TV & Movie parts | Site Map: more tips